BUILDING INFO

One-Piece Hydraulic Door installation

Wood Building Details

Understand Large Moving Hydraulic Doors...

What Makes Large Hydraulic Doors Work?

There are a few things to understand about the way your building should be structured when adding a hydraulic door. A common concern is that the hydraulic door puts a lot of stress on the building, which is not untrue. Many wood building engineers have a tendency to get lax with the design of the supports for the hydraulic door as well as the framing and forget that we not only have to support the weight and wind on the door, but also its operation. It is better to overbuild now than have to worry about making costly repairs later.

Myths That Can't Be Ignored

Common Misconceptions

• Building does not need to be designed stronger

• Building does not need to be engineered with extra reinforcements to hold a hydraulic/bifold door

• The hydraulic door is self supporting

THE REALITY

The hydraulic door is not a billboard; it is not capable of standing independently. All the forces from the hydraulic door opening and from wind loads will get transferred through the door subframing to your building.

Use common sense when designing your building to have a hydraulic door. Don't assume that your hydraulic door can be left open in windy conditions just because your building can handle the weight of the hydraulic door. And be sure to refer to the Schweiss hydraulic door specification sheets that come with each hydraulic door to help you understand the forces.

Hydraulic Door Forces

Hydraulic doors come with two powerful cylinders that are pre-mounted to a vertical subframe with one cylinder on each side of the hydraulic door frame. The cylinders exert strong rotating forces to the hydraulic door side columns as the hydraulic door operates. It’s important to limit the rotation of the hydraulic door side columns when the hydraulic door is open, as well as when it is opening and closing.

Helpful Tips

• To aid in limiting this rotation, horizontal braces are strongly recommended at the point on the hydraulic door column where the cylinder attaches.

• To help resist the torsional forces in the hydraulic door side column, use horizontal bracing to the next adjacent building column in the same plane of the hydraulic door.

• These horizontal braces help resist the torsional load in the hydraulic door side column.

Preparing Your Building For a Hydraulic Door

Things to Consider when preparing your building for a Hydraulic/Bifold Door

• Is bracing necessary, and what should it look like?

• Is the building acceptably designed?

• Old buildings vs. new buildings

Building Design

The building could be considered to be "acceptably designed" if the designer is told the correct loads that are going to be put on the building and they have designed the building to withstand these loads.

Existing buildings can be a bigger problem. They may not have been designed for the intentions you have for it, or the original designer or building company may not be willing to help. It is important to either have a qualified engineer or the original designer design the modification using the correct loads and eccentricity information. All of the "recommendations" that Schweiss has on their spec sheets are recommendations that go a long way toward making the building appropriately.

Hydraulic Door Forces on the Side Columns

Hydraulic Door Forces on the Side Columns

Different Size Columns - Chart

Different Size Columns - Building Info Chart

Bolting Rafters To The Hydraulic Door Side Columns

Bolting Rafters to the Hydraulic Door Side Columns

Wood Frame Bracing - Call Out

Wood Frame Bracing - Building Info Diagram

Vertical Stiffeners by Each Hinge Location

Vertical Stiffeners by Each Hinge Location - Schweiss Doors

Tying The Rafters Together with 2' x 6's - Example Only

Tying the Rafters together with 2' x 6's - Schweiss Wood Building Doors

Bracing Between The Rafters

Bracing Between the Rafters - Schweiss Doors

Hydraulic Door Column Bracing (Both Door Columns - Each End of the Door)

Brace both Sides of Schweiss Hydraulic Door

Strength The Endwall (Two Rafters Back-to-Back - Style 1)

Strength Endwall with Back-to-Back Rafters

Strength The Endwall (One Rafter on Each Side of the Building Columns - Style 2)

Strength Endwall - Rafters on Both Side of Building Columns

Strength The Endwall - Example - Hydraulic Door

Bracing, Rafters, Vertical Stiffeners all strength the Endwall

The hydraulic cylinders exert rotating force to the building door side columns as the door is being operated... See Below

Inward Force of Hydraulic Door on Endwall

Horizontal Bracing...increase the torsional stiffness of the door columns
The subframe that the hydraulic cylinders attach to mount to the building door side columns. The hydraulic cylinders exert strong rotating forces to the building door side columns as the door is being operated. It is important to limit the rotation of the door side columns. To aid in limiting this rotation, horizontal braces are strongly recommended at the point on the door column where the cylinder attaches.

Horizontal Bracing - Torsional Stiffness of Door Columns

Horizontal bracing is used to stop the doors vertical subframe and cylinder bracket and buildings door side column from twisting. To help resist the torsional forces in the door side columns, use horizontal bracing to the next adjacent building column in the plane of the door. These horizontal braces help resist the torsional load in the door side columns.

Endwall Header / Rafter Must Not Bow Outward

Rafters must not bow outward

Wood Building Details (C)

Wood Building Details - Endwall and Sidewall

Wood Building - Header Built Into Endwall (STYLE 1)

Header Built into Endwall

Shows where a header is installed in an endwall of a building. The header is positioned up above the bottom of the rafter so you won’t lose any headroom!

Open Endwall Rafters - Header Placements
We work with old or new buildings to make your bifold door work.

Endwall Rafter - Header placement

Wood Building - Bottom Cord as header (STYLE 2)

Bottom Cord as header

Shows where a header is, using the bottom chord in an endwall of a building.
The engineered rafters can be doubled up to sufficient support.

Bottom Cord as Header Placement

Wood Building - All About Additional Bracing

Additional Bracing information for Endwall Hydraulic Door

Bolt Rafters to the Side Columns

Bolt Rafters to the Side Columns

Vertical Braces

Vertical Braces - Vertical Stiffeners

NOTE:

On double endwall trusses where the outside ply is a "Gable Type" truss and the inside is an "Intermediate Truss", there will be locations where there is a 1:50" space between the vertical stiffener and the horizontal members of the gable truss.

THE CUSTOMER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE BUILDING STRUCTURE & DOOR HEADER.

Wood Building Sidewall With Freestanding Header

Wood Building Side Column Freestanding Header - Schweiss Hydraulic Doors

Steel Building Details

Steel-building Hydraulic Schweiss door

Steel Building w/Stub Columns

Stub Columns on Strength Building

Steel Building Endwall Details

Steel Building Endwall Details

Place Header Within Mainframe

Steel building - header placement

Attaching Header Using Stub Ends

Steel Building with Stug Ends - header placement

Mainframe Endwall

Header within Main frame Endwall

Mainframe Endwall - Below Main Frame

Header below Main Frame

Steel Building Details - Side View

Main Frame set back from the Face of the Endwall
Schweiss Does it Better!